Jeffrey Turner

MOVING THE STONES

 

Hand set and printed by John Grice at Evergreen Press.

This unillustrated publication contains the following five poems:

The Song of the Waterfall

Moving the Stones

Chorley Cemetery

After a Summer Storm, Harbledown

Lost Voyages

Edition of 80 copies. Distributed from March 2009. Not for sale.

253 mm × 154 mm. 16 pages.

Printed in black in Arrighi and Centaur, on various different papers, in a dark grey Saint-Armand handmade paper cover printed in semi-opaque white in Centaur. Unsigned.

 

A.  LOSIN COPIES

45 copies on cream Losin handmade paper.

 

B.  TUCKENHAY COPIES

18 copies on white Tuckenhay Mill mould-made paper.

 

C.  BATCHELOR ‘LECTERN BIBLE’ COPIES

Ten copies on white Batchelor handmade paper, believed to be the same stock used to print the famous Oxford Lectern Bible designed by Bruce Rogers.

 

D.  VAN GELDER COPIES

Two copies on cream Van Gelder handmade paper.

 

E.  BATCHELOR ‘TWIN OTTER’ COPIES

Two copies on white Batchelor Kelmscott ‘Twin Otter’ handmade paper – a paper made to the same specifications as that which Batchelor made for the Kelmscott Press.

 

F.  BARCHAM GREEN COPIES

Three copies on green-grey Barcham Green ‘Turner Grey’ handmade paper.

 

NOTES:

It was originally intended (as the colophon still states) that the entire edition would be printed on Losin. It turned out that the printer didn’t have enough for the entire run, and production would have wait a while to obtain some more. John suggested that the balance of the copies could be printed on a variety of different papers that he’d accumulated over the years. I thought this a great idea as it gave me the chance to have some Chestnut Press items printed on a selection of beautiful old papers that had long since ceased to be made.

The title page features the first use of the Chestnut Press pressmark, designed by myself and printed from a zinc line block.

Regarding production, I’d like to take this opportunity to apologise to John Grice for all the fiddly spacing amends I asked of him. I’m sure it was an absolute pain in the ‘proverbial’, but I think the results made it well worth it.

 

 

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